For the school, the benefits of mindfulness can translate to improved academic attainment, as highlighted below in the Mindful Nation UK Report produced by the Mindfulness All-Party Parliamentary Group (2015):

‘Since chronic stress can negatively impact on maturation of the brain areas involved in learning, interventions to improve executive function which also support stress reduction, such as mindfulness, are more likely to result in academic improvements. Indeed, studies on mindfulness with children and adolescents have demonstrated benefits in cognitive (e.g. attention) and academic outcomes.’

Public Health England also found that “an 11% boost in results in standardised achievement tests has been linked to school programmes that directly improve students’ social and emotional learning,” in their report ‘The link between pupil health and wellbeing and attainment,‘ (November 2014).

Mindfulness has been shown to have positive effects on burnout, wellbeing and stress. It has also been proven to improve concentration and can impact on a number of cognitive skills such as improved reaction times, comprehension scores, memory and decision-making (MAPPG, 2015).


“An 11% boost in results in standardised achievement tests has been linked to school programmes that directly improve students’ social and emotional learning.”

“The culture, ethos and environment of a school influences the health and wellbeing of pupils and their readiness to learn.”

 

“Whole-school approaches to social and emotional learning, universally implemented for all pupils, strongly correlate with higher attainment.”

'Extracts from the link between pupil health and wellbeing and attainment,'
published by Public Health England in November 2014.


The Mindfulness Training levels